Dr Samina's blog posts

Insights on different aspects of gynaecology and pregnancy from Dr Samina

 

 

 

 

Blog Post 4 -What is a Colposcopy?

Colposcopy is a medical diagnostic procedure to examine an illuminated, magnified view of the cervix as well as the vagina and vulva. Many pre-malignant lesions and malignant lesions in these areas have discernible characteristics that can be detected through the examination. Colposcopy is a way to get a close-up look at your cervix. It’s a quick and easy way to find cell changes in your cervix that may turn into cancer.

Dr Samina uses a colposcope, which looks like a pair of binoculars with a bright light. It allows her to get a greatly magnified view of the surface of the vagina and cervix. If an area needs further investigation, Dr Samina can remove a tiny piece of tissue and send it away for a biopsy.

You might need a colposcopy if you have:

  • abnormal results from a cervical screening test (which has replaced the traditional pap smear, which most women should routinely have)
  • unusual or unexplained bleeding, such as after intercourse
  • an abnormal lump or growth on your cervix or vagina

The procedure can help diagnose conditions such as:

  • cervical cancer or precancer
  • benign growths such as polyps
  • inflammation of the cervix
  • genital warts.

Dr Samina has a colposcope in her rooms at St Vincent’s Private (Werribee) and at her rooms in St Albans, so the procedure can be performed on the day of your appointment. To know more contact one of our friendly receptionists at her rooms, who can guide you further or email contact@drsamina.com.au

 

Blog Post 3 – What is Hyperemesis Gravidarum and Severe Morning Sickness?

Nausea and vomiting are common in pregnancy, especially in the first trimester – this is usually referred to as morning sickness. A small number of pregnant women experience excessive nausea and vomiting. This condition is known as ‘hyperemesis gravidarum’ and often needs hospital treatment. You might not have heard of this before until Kate Middleton (The Duchess of Cambridge) made is headlines in 2014.

Excessive vomiting in pregnancy is much worse than the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness. Symptoms usually start between 5 and 10 weeks of pregnancy and usually resolve by around 20 weeks. Signs and symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum include:

  • prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting
  • dehydration
  • ketosis — a serious condition that is caused by a raised number of ketones in the blood and urine (ketones are poisonous acidic chemicals that are produced when your body breaks down fat, rather than glucose, for energy)
  • weight loss
  • low blood pressure (hypotension) when standing up
  • headaches, confusion, fainting and jaundice

The nausea and vomiting are usually so severe that it’s impossible to keep any fluids down, and this can cause dehydration and weight loss. Dehydration is when you don’t have enough fluids in your body.

Hyperemesis gravidarum is very unpleasant with dramatic symptoms, but the good news is it’s unlikely to harm your baby. However, if it causes you to lose weight during pregnancy there is an increased risk that your baby may be born smaller than expected.

Mild cases of hyperemesis gravidarum may be controlled with a change in diet, rest and antacids. Severe cases may need specialist treatment, and you may need to be admitted to hospital so that your Obstetrician can assess your condition and give you the right treatment. This can include intravenous fluids given through a drip to treat the ketosis and treatment to stop the vomiting.

If you experience these symptoms during pregnancy, Dr Samina is here to help and as a mother has experienced these things as well, so understands what a pregnant woman is going through. If you have any questions, please contact our rooms or via email: contact@drsamina.com.au

 

Blog Post 1 – What happens when you have a breech baby?

A breech baby is when the baby is positioned bottom first late in pregnancy. Breech births can be complicated for both mother and baby, and planning for this occurance should be done in consultation with your Obstetrician.
About 3 percent of all births are breech, and babies will often turn themselves around towards the last stages (35+ weeks) of pregnancy. If your baby is breech, which is usually detected by an ultrsound, your doctor might suggest performing an ECV (External Cephalic Version) after 37 weeks. The aim of this is to turn the baby into the head first position, ready for a vaginal birth.

 

How is an ECV performed?

An obstetrician will put their hands on the abdomen to try to turn the baby into a head-down position.

A foetal doppler will monitor your baby’s wellbeing for 20-30 minutes before the procedure and again after the procedure.

A small needle will be inserted into your hand so that medication to relax your uterus can be administered directly into your vein.

An obstetrician will then perform an ultrasound to confirm the position of the baby, and then attempt to turn the baby by pressing their hands firmly on your abdomen. Some women find this uncomfortable, while others don’t. The pressure on your abdomen lasts a few minutes. If the first attempt is unsuccessful, the obstetrician might try again. According to medical literature the ECV has a 40-70 per cent success rate. The procedure only takes a few mintues, but it can be uncomfortable for some women.

 

When is ECV not recommended?

 a complicated pregnancy

 

Every woman and pregnancy are different, so make sure any concerns or questions you have are discussed with your Obstetrician.

What happens when you have a breech baby?

A breech baby is when the baby is positioned bottom first late in pregnancy. Breech births can be complicated for both mother and baby, and planning for this occurance should be done in consultation with your Obstetrician.
About 3 percent of all births are breech, and babies will often turn themselves around towards the last stages (35+ weeks) of pregnancy. If your baby is breech, which is usually detected by an ultrsound, your doctor might suggest performing an ECV (External Cephalic Version) after 37 weeks. The aim of this is to turn the baby into the head first position, ready for a vaginal birth.

 

How is an ECV performed?

An obstetrician will put their hands on the abdomen to try to turn the baby into a head-down position.

A foetal doppler will monitor your baby’s wellbeing for 20-30 minutes before the procedure and again after the procedure.

A small needle will be inserted into your hand so that medication to relax your uterus can be administered directly into your vein.

An obstetrician will then perform an ultrasound to confirm the position of the baby, and then attempt to turn the baby by pressing their hands firmly on your abdomen. Some women find this uncomfortable, while others don’t. The pressure on your abdomen lasts a few minutes. If the first attempt is unsuccessful, the obstetrician might try again. According to medical literature the ECV has a 40-70 per cent success rate. The procedure only takes a few mintues, but it can be uncomfortable for some women.

 

When is ECV not recommended?

 a complicated pregnancy

 

Every woman and pregnancy are different, so make sure any concerns or questions you have are discussed with your Obstetrician.

What happens when you have a breech baby?

A breech baby is when the baby is positioned bottom first late in pregnancy. Breech births can be complicated for both mother and baby, and planning for this occurance should be done in consultation with your Obstetrician.
About 3 percent of all births are breech, and babies will often turn themselves around towards the last stages (35+ weeks) of pregnancy. If your baby is breech, which is usually detected by an ultrsound, your doctor might suggest performing an ECV (External Cephalic Version) after 37 weeks. The aim of this is to turn the baby into the head first position, ready for a vaginal birth.

 

How is an ECV performed?

An obstetrician will put their hands on the abdomen to try to turn the baby into a head-down position.

A foetal doppler will monitor your baby’s wellbeing for 20-30 minutes before the procedure and again after the procedure.

A small needle will be inserted into your hand so that medication to relax your uterus can be administered directly into your vein.

An obstetrician will then perform an ultrasound to confirm the position of the baby, and then attempt to turn the baby by pressing their hands firmly on your abdomen. Some women find this uncomfortable, while others don’t. The pressure on your abdomen lasts a few minutes. If the first attempt is unsuccessful, the obstetrician might try again. According to medical literature the ECV has a 40-70 per cent success rate. The procedure only takes a few mintues, but it can be uncomfortable for some women.

 

When is ECV not recommended?

 a complicated pregnancy

 

Every woman and pregnancy are different, so make sure any concerns or questions you have are discussed with your Obstetrician.

What happens when you have a breech baby?

A breech baby is when the baby is positioned bottom first late in pregnancy. Breech births can be complicated for both mother and baby, and planning for this occurance should be done in consultation with your Obstetrician.
About 3 percent of all births are breech, and babies will often turn themselves around towards the last stages (35+ weeks) of pregnancy. If your baby is breech, which is usually detected by an ultrsound, your doctor might suggest performing an ECV (External Cephalic Version) after 37 weeks. The aim of this is to turn the baby into the head first position, ready for a vaginal birth.

 

How is an ECV performed?

An obstetrician will put their hands on the abdomen to try to turn the baby into a head-down position.

A foetal doppler will monitor your baby’s wellbeing for 20-30 minutes before the procedure and again after the procedure.

A small needle will be inserted into your hand so that medication to relax your uterus can be administered directly into your vein.

An obstetrician will then perform an ultrasound to confirm the position of the baby, and then attempt to turn the baby by pressing their hands firmly on your abdomen. Some women find this uncomfortable, while others don’t. The pressure on your abdomen lasts a few minutes. If the first attempt is unsuccessful, the obstetrician might try again. According to medical literature the ECV has a 40-70 per cent success rate. The procedure only takes a few mintues, but it can be uncomfortable for some women.

 

When is ECV not recommended?

 a complicated pregnancy

 

Every woman and pregnancy are different, so make sure any concerns or questions you have are discussed with your Obstetrician.

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